RUSSIA including USSR

 

 

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CZECH/RUSSIA COMPARISON

Left is the Czech M53 (clone of the Russian Ssh39), right is the Russian M40.

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CZECH/RUSSIA COMPARISON

Left is the Czech M53 (clone of the Russian Ssh39), right is the Russian Ssh68, the last Russian helmet before the introduction of Kevlar shells.

 

 

 

 

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RUSSIA Ssh40 - side

Outwardly identical to that issued during WW2. Apart from a small number of Ssh60's, this was the only Russian helmet until the fullscale introduction of the Ssh68 in the late 1970's.

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RUSSIA Ssh40 - front

The Ssh60 is virtually identical to this in shape, but has four high-mounted liner rivets and two lower chinstrap rivets, and has the same type of liner as the Ssh68.

 

 

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RUSSIA Ssh40 - liner

This is the slightly less common version with the East German A-type chinstrap, here fitted as 'standard' and not retrofitted to a normal helmet with pre-existing d-rings.
There is no stamp in this example, so dating is a guess, but this chinstrap rig puts it around the 1960s (?)

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RUSSIA_Ssh40 - front

This example is dated 1949.

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RUSSIA Ssh40 - back

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RUSSIA_Ssh40-side

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RUSSIA Ssh40 - stamp detail

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RUSSIA Ssh40 - strap detail

 

 

 

 

 

 

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RUSSIA_Ssh60_front

It's the same basic shell as the Ssh39 and 40, but this time there are six liner rivets. arranged three to a side.

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RUSSIA_Ssh60_back

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RUSSIA_Ssh60_side

The three rivets -two high, one low - are clearly seen here. The two higher ones hold steel strips which in turn support the pads of the liner, the lower is for the chinstrap.

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RUSSIA_Ssh60_liner

As you can see this is essentially the same liner as used on the later Ssh68, and was designed to be worn over a service cap or in winter the thick 'ushanka' fur hat.

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RUSSIA_Ssh60_strap detail

According to Robert Clawson in his excellent RUSSIAN HELMETS this stamping is a comparatively recent innovation, and is on all ex-military surplus sold through authorised agents by the Russian federation.

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RUSSIA_Ssh60 stamp

Not very legible in this photo, unfortunately, and not much more readable with the Mk 1 eyeball.
I can make out P1 and 66, making this example a 1966 production.

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RUSSIA_Ssh60 buckle detail

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RUSSIA_Sch60 chinstrap loop detail

Note the odd bit of webbing - the leather chinstrap is actually riveted to that, which in turn is riveted to the helmet side. It is an odd arrangement.

 

 

 

 

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RUSSIA Ssh68 - side

The last Russian steel helmet, still in service, as from the late 1970s. Note four liner fixing rivets, high on the shell.

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RUSSIA Ssh68 - liner

Very simple oilcloth-type liner, not padded. Extremely simple, to the point of crudity, chinstrap.

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RUSSIA Ssh68 - liner

Liner is designed so that helmet can be worn on top of a substantial cap or other head-covering in cold conditions.

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RUSSIA Ssh68 - side

Known in the West as the 'conehead' for obvious reasons.